Auto Insuranceinews
Collision insurance in Ontario: What you need to know
Collision insurance in Ontario: What you need to know

Collision insurance in Ontario: What you need to know

Being involved in an accident can be stressful. Once the shock of the incident wears off, you’ll need to have your car repaired or replaced.  Understanding your auto policy coverage is important at a time like this. To help you through this experience, we’ve answered some of the more commonly asked collision insurance questions.

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What is collision coverage in Ontario?

What is collision coverage in Ontario?

No one enjoys being on the receiving end of an auto collision, but you can take some comfort in the fact that your damages will be covered by your auto insurance policy.  But what happens when you are the one responsible for the accident?  In Canada, there are many auto insurance coverages that are mandatory, like DC-PD, third-party liability and accident benefits. Collision insurance isn’t one of them—it’s considered optional coverage that you can add to your existing policy.  Let’s take a look at auto insurance from the perspective of an auto accident to help you gain a better understanding of collision coverage in Ontario.

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Everything you need to know about Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD)
Everything you need to know about Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD)

Everything you need to know about Direct Compensation Property Damage (DCPD)

In Ontario, part of the no-fault auto insurance system includes coverage in the event that you are in a not-at-fault accident.  Direct compensation property damage (DCPD) is a mandatory component of car policies in provinces with no-fault systems. So, why is it such an integral part of your auto policy? Let's take a closer look.

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large lease down payment - Closeup hand giving a car key and money for loan credit financial, lease and rental concept
Is a large lease down payment on a car a good idea?

Is a large lease down payment on a car a good idea?

Traditionally, when buying or leasing a vehicle it is always best to have a down payment ready. It is the smart choice to reduce your overall payments.  Making a big down payment will lower your monthly payments and will leave you less likely to be 'upside down' if the car is totalled, meaning your loan balance owing is worth more than the value of your car.  However, it is possible to secure a car lease that works with your budget. In fact, if the lease terms are good, the smart play may be to put down as little money down as possible. In this article, we will breakdown how your car lease is/ is not affected by a down payment to help you decide if money upfront is the right choice for you.

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AirTags and stolen cars: Apple to improve safety measures
AirTags and stolen cars: Apple to improve safety measures

AirTags and stolen cars: Apple to improve safety measures

In 2021, Apple introduced AirTag technology which would allow users like you keep track of personal items.  Your keys, wallet, purse, backpack, luggage, and more can be found through the Find My app on your iPhone. However, since then the device has found utility in more nefarious circles.  Thus far, thieves have used the AirTags to steal cars, and track people without their knowledge. In addition, individuals have been selling AirTags with their  external, presence-announcing speakers removed. In response to these reports, Apple is taking firm steps to prevent unwanted tracking. Here is a breakdown of Apple’s AirTag safety measures in the works to help thwart criminal activity using their technology.

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Hit and run accidents: What you need to know
Hit and run accidents: What you need to know

Hit and run accidents: What you need to know

A Hit and Run Accident is an accident where one of the involved parties fails to stop, or leaves the scene of an accident without identifying themselves. It is considered a felony crime and can result in up to 5 years of imprisonment if charged under the Criminal Code of Canada. Lighter cases can be charged under provincial laws, e.g.  the Highway Traffic Act of Ontario.  To help clarify fail to remain incidents and their consequences, we've compiled answers to some of the most FAQs about hit and run accidents .